Welcome, Guest
Username Password: Remember me

Triming DV files for a "clips" movie
(1 viewing) (1) Guest
  • Page:
  • 1

TOPIC: Triming DV files for a "clips" movie

Triming DV files for a "clips" movie 6 years, 2 months ago #22541

I have recently converted 100+ 6 hr VHS tape to 2hr DVD's and now have converted those to DV digital files. I have the converted MP4 files AND the DV files(which are much bigger) I now have about 200, 2 hours DV files. These are all on about 3, 2TB Firewire drives.

My goal is to just take 10-20 sec clips from these DV files and make a Movie of the family over the last 30 years..I'm imaging a 1-2 hr movie.

My question is: I how do I manage file sizes of these clips. How do Import them? DO I trim the clips in the DV file within FCE?

Any suggestion on how to handle the big files would be appreciated. Thanks so much for any advice.

Re: Triming DV files for a "clips" movie 6 years, 2 months ago #22542

  • Kittihawk
  • OFFLINE
  • 1st Assistant Director
  • Posts: 249
  • Karma: 0
Hi Wayne,

I had been thinking about a similar project using our family DV tapes too - there must be at least 100 over the last eight or so years since I first owned DV cameras.

With regard to your question I don't think there is any problem pulling in all the raw DV rushes into the browser - I have never had a problem with the number of rushes tapes and have had at least fifty in some projects. However, I think there is a time restriction on a time-line of 12 hours (or there was in FCP6 not sure about FCE). In any case if you make such a big time line it will be pretty unwieldy. Best just to go through each of the raw rushes tapes in the browser, marking in and out points using 'I' and 'O' keys and lay small clips of the best bits onto the time line. So the basic answer is yes, import them all but then select clips from them in the browser window onto the timeline - don't plonk them all whole onto one timeline.

If you want to sort the rushes a bit more you could always sub-clip them (Apple U, after marking the in and out, I think is the short cut; a new sub clip will appear in the browser with a 'broken' type track symbol by it denoting 'sub-clip') - which allows you to label the sub-clips for future reference. If you do this take 'handles': bits of extra material on each side of the in and out points because you will not be able to get to the rest of the media outside the sub-clip. OR you could make use of the marking system, letting the rushes tape play in the browser and hitting 'M' when you want to make a note of a good bit (pressing it twice allows you to make a note). You will probably just extract the best bits into the time line at the same time but marking allows you to go back again more easily (- shift "arrow up" key moves forward through the markers).

Also, if your edit software allows (I am working on FCP 7 not FCE) make use of the colour labelling as much as possible - it is brilliant for finding your way around big projects. Be as tidy as you can in the browser and group similar types of rushes e.g. by year in their own bins etc. - doesn't matter what system you have but just make a system so you can find things!

John
Last Edit: 6 years, 2 months ago by Kittihawk.

Re: Triming DV files for a "clips" movie 6 years, 2 months ago #22548

  • Duane
  • OFFLINE
  • Executive Producer
  • Posts: 5513
  • Karma: 9
You can import into Final Cut (Express or Pro) by dragging media clips from the Macintosh Finder into the Final Cut Express Browser window; it's that simple. Keep in mind, though, that Final Cut is a database. Unlike iMovie, the Final Cut project references the original clips on your hard drives and does not create a new version of the clip in the project. That is why the Final Cut Express project holding your hundreds of hours and many TeraBytes of video and audio clips will only be a couple dozen MegaBytes in size.

To learn the basics of editing check out the Apple Final Cut Express Resources page. I am a huge fan of the Apple Pro Training Series of books from Peachpit Press; the Final Cut Express book is mentioned on the Resource page. Consider attending a class at an Apple Certified Training Centre close to you. Also check to see if there is a Final Cut User Group near you.

Lastly, a 1-2 hour video, unless it is extremely well done, is the painful equivalent of the "slide show of my vacation trip" joke. Make it shorter and sweeter.

And for John, you can always Modify > Remove Subclip Limits is you want to see the entire clip that a subclip was created from.
Duane E. Martin
Earth to Sky Pictures Inc.
Apple Certified Trainer - Final Cut Pro
Copyright - all rights reserved.

Re: Triming DV files for a "clips" movie 6 years, 2 months ago #22552

  • Kittihawk
  • OFFLINE
  • 1st Assistant Director
  • Posts: 249
  • Karma: 0
It's worth saying that the normal work flow would be to log everything and digitize it in as manageable, named, clips. But that's in an ideal world and with this much media that's an awful lot of work plus I guess the way it was transferred meant that each 'tape' came in as one big file. I frequently have to deal with this much media and so I really understand where you are coming from and you need a quick way to deal with it in a limited time.

I agree with Martin - two hours is a lot if it is for the normal viewing public and without a structured compelling story, as it were. However, for family history when everyone is involved and for the sake of an archive record, then I don't think it is too much. Currently I'm putting something together for a 70th family birthday and some of it is very, very funny - but only to the family who know the people so well.

Thanks for the sub clip tip.

John
Last Edit: 6 years, 2 months ago by Kittihawk.

Re: Triming DV files for a "clips" movie 10 months, 2 weeks ago #23433

  • janekong
  • OFFLINE
  • Production Assistant
  • Posts: 15
  • Karma: 0
Or you can choose another video tool to trim wanted clip from your DV files, and then edit it with FCP later.
  • Page:
  • 1
Time to create page: 0.44 seconds