Welcome, Guest
Username Password: Remember me

Lighting theory made simple?
(1 viewing) (1) Guest
  • Page:
  • 1

TOPIC: Lighting theory made simple?

Lighting theory made simple? 13 years, 2 months ago #1523

  • Duane_Martin
  • OFFLINE
  • Executive Producer
  • Posts: 5513
  • Karma: 9
I was really hoping a member with some Gaffing experience might post an article giving some basic lighting theory, or at least direct us to some existing articles on the web. So this is the call, folks. I know we have members with this kind of experience. Let us hear from you.
Duane E. Martin
Earth to Sky Pictures Inc.
Apple Certified Trainer - Final Cut Pro
Copyright - all rights reserved.

Re: Lighting theory made simple? 13 years, 1 month ago #1743

  • gnuhaus
  • OFFLINE
  • 2nd Assistant Director
  • Posts: 147
  • Karma: 0
I have very little experience lighting anything, but I found this 7-part series to be helpful in my understanding:

Stephen Schleicher on Lighting

Re: Lighting theory made simple? 9 years, 7 months ago #16593

I have a small amount of experience Lighting.

Lighting all comes down to what you have available. The very minimum you want to work with is a 3 light set up. A key, Fill and background. Of course the more light you have access to the better DOF and the more you can play around with contrast.

Key is the most important, probably the light with the most power. This is normally camera right on the subject.

Fill is just that, it fills the rest of the scene and normally camera left and it's measurement is depending on what type of scene you are shooting or what type of mood you want to set.

Background.... it lights your background  

It also comes down to what type of scene you are shooting. Action, Drama, Comedy ext...

If you have access to a light meter this will help out greatly and just remember one stop means double the light. So if you have your iris opened up to a 2.0 if you close it down to a 2.4, double the light is now going through the iris. Think of the iris on the camera like your eye. If its really bright out your iris is "closed down" really small. If there isn't a lot of light it "opens up" to allow more light in.

For action and drama you want to go with a 2:1 or even a 3:1 ratio. What that means is on your subject you want one side of his face lit at say a 4.0 and the other side at a 2.8 and so on. And for some odd reason you want the "4.0" side camera right. Don't ask me why haha.

For comedy you almost want to be at a 1:1, very little contrast and a lot of colors. I know that's pretty flat but most comedies are unless it's a "Dark" comedy.

Things to watch for...

Double shadow from your key and fill. If this happens try and raise both lights so the shadows hit the floor more and not the background.

I know its not much and most of you probably know this, just wanted to put that out incase anyone doesn't.

Oh yeah... one thing I also learned about lighting... nothing is really wrong and there really isn't a real "rule" when it comes to lighting... just like making a film, every rule is made to be broken and is encouraged to be broken. Well that was just the message I got from my DP instructor at school haha.

Re: Lighting theory made simple? 4 years, 9 months ago #23049

  • Saxena
  • OFFLINE
  • Trainee PA
  • Posts: 1
  • Karma: 0
May be a bit late for response here, but for one person interviews I just started using a Lowel Rifa led ceiling fan lights
 as my key light. Nice and soft and then use my reflector to add a bit of fill on the other side. I've got a little Pepper (200 watts) to add a bit rim led ceiling lights on the shoulders.

I also have tota lights I have used for years there so light weight and portable. The down side is that they throw light everywhere and have to be gelled like crazy to soften the recessed led ceiling lights. If you've got a nice bit of muslin you would not be able to control the light very easily with the totas to keep them from spilling onto your back drop.
Last Edit: 4 years, 9 months ago by Saxena.

Re: Lighting theory made simple? 4 years, 9 months ago #23054

  • Duane
  • OFFLINE
  • Executive Producer
  • Posts: 5513
  • Karma: 9
Appreciated and great tips. What I think is cool is when the request was originally made a solution like yours did not exist! I don't remember a lot of LED kits at NAB 8 years ago.
Duane E. Martin
Earth to Sky Pictures Inc.
Apple Certified Trainer - Final Cut Pro
Copyright - all rights reserved.
Last Edit: 4 years, 9 months ago by Duane.
  • Page:
  • 1
Time to create page: 0.37 seconds